Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Historic Strawberry Mansion is currently closed

The Grounds

Take a Stroll in our award winning gardens

Filled with native plants that are found throughout southeastern Pennsylvania, our gardens provide a sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of Philadelphia.

The Kitchen Garden

In the front of the mansion is an enclosed kitchen garden where we grow a variety of edible fruits and vegetables. These include strawberries (of course!), potatoes, radishes, onions, and more. Other garden areas provide us with raspberries and blackberries.

Our famous strawberry patch is part of our kitchen garden and orchard. It is tended by our master gardener and volunteers from around the city, through the Philadelphia Orchard Project

The Secret Garden

To the side of the mansion is the Secret Garden, created in honor of Emilie Bregy, one of our most dedicated board members. It is a relaxing oasis, surrounded by nature.

The Azalea Path as it looked in 1963

The Elizabeth Price Martin Azalea Path

Located in the back, this path was planted in 1933 in honor of Elizabeth Price Martin, the first president of Historic Strawberry Mansion. In May, you can see all of the beautiful azaleas in full bloom along the perimeter of the yard.

The Orchard

Our orchard includes a variety of fruit trees, planted with the help of the Philadelphia Orchard Project in 2015.

One of our most notable trees is the Trifoliate Orange, which blooms in the late fall and produces a small, bitter citrus fruit. We host workshops on how to use the fruit from this tree.

Community members are welcome to come and pick the fruit from our trees, but most of our produce is eaten by native wildlife, including groundhogs, deer, and foxes. Any surplus is donated to food banks throughout the city.

The Apiary

Members of the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild to our beehives and harvest the honey.

During occasional special event days, the beekeepers open the hives to demonstrate basic beekeeping.

To support our bees, we have a pollinator garden filled with native wildflowers and designed to attract all different pollinators, including bees and butterflies.

Our hives don’t produce enough honey to sell throughout the year, but we do have Pennsylvania Wildflower honey for sale at the mansion, the proceeds of which go to support our hives.